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Goshen Community Market: the Power of a Good Foundation

Success begins with a sound foundation. How many times have you heard that sentiment? Whether we are talking architecture, education or parenting, a strong foundation is the common denominator to success. This is also true of one of my favorite places on Earth: the Goshen Community Market.

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Dayempur Farm: The Business of Food, Fellowship and Faith

I was at Dayempur Farm near the end of April, learning about this self-sufficient Sufi community’s sustainable spin on farming and living in Southern Illinois. The journey took me to the edge of the Shawnee National Forest, onto 60 acres of pristine land, some cultivated, some left wild and wooded, but none sprayed by pesticides and herbicides that mar most modern commercial agriculture.

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Home Cooking at La Vista: A Recipe for Courage

Home is my best way to describe the cooking class out at beautiful La Vista Ecological Learning Center a couple of Saturdays ago. We were nearly a room full of strangers when we started. There were some familiar faces, but many people I’d never met. I just knew right away that I belonged.

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Love What You Have 40-Day Challenge

Remember Project Drawdown— and the Eco-challenge issued through the Northwest Earth Institute to take small everyday actions that were proven to mitigate climate change? Well, I’m happy to report Project Drawdown continues and is gearing up for another round of challenges this spring beginning April 3 and running through April 24. You can register your team or just join as an individual to begin your own drawdown on climate change. But why wait! I have an immediate suggestion….

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Mother Love and Kitchen Wisdom

My friend Teresa Kennedy makes the best fish soup I have ever tasted, hands down. It is the dish always requested when our group of friends (That would be the Mermaids, BTW.) gets together for food, fun and frolic. Her fish soup is rich, balanced and comforting, not to mention highly nutritious. Now Teresa is a terrific cook, so it is possible that this soup is everyone’s favorite because of her mastery of culinary techniques and her inspired intuition, but when you get to the bottom of the pot, there’s quite a bit more magic in this recipe than meets the mouth. It begins and ends with love—and Betty Crocker!

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New Year—New You? Guidance from My Friend Jane and the Always-Helpful New Hope Network Blogger Box

Well here we are once again—saying goodbye to the old year and ushering in a new one, promising to never to “that” again and vowing to change all our evil ways overnight. Good luck.

Or better than luck, why not go with “healthy curiosity and personal-best strategies”? Make your new start into 2019 an exploration rather than an ultimatum. Start with a few small changes and keep building. I know, you are rolling your eyes and thinking: “There she goes again with her anti-New Year’s resolution stuff.” Well, ok, I hear ya. So I thought this year, I’d let someone else share her success and hopefully inspire you to find yours—meet my friend Jane, an accomplished educator, master baker, beautiful woman (inside and out) and recent convert to a Ketogenic way of life.

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Lardy, Let’s Bake a Christmas Pie!

No…not a misspelling, so I guess you know where we are headed, right? It was after my post on the Pumpkin Cheesecake last month and my reminiscence about sharing a piece of pumpkin pie with my grandma, that I realized, while I have preached pumpkin and shared a million pumpkin recipes during the past three years, I’ve never offered to share my grandma’s pumpkin pie. Amazing.

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Shop Green, Shop Local, Shop Women-Owned!

One of the most important ideas I try to impart here at Green Gal of the Midwest is to buy responsibly—to buy local and green whenever possible—and to choose carefully when products come from far away. There is a greater impact on the world than you might think when you speak with your hard-earned dollars. And, of course, buying less big stuff and spending more on simple and healthy gifts from local artisans, business people and my wonderful farmers is echoed all the time in these posts—but particularly at this time of year when the shopping frenzy reaches an all-time peak and grasping for the best deal, not matter what the cost to your health and wellbeing—not to mention the planet’s wellbeing—can be downright toxic.

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A Ray of Hope

I often wonder if the next generation will take up these causes because, let’s face it, I’m old. This Earth and these rights I’m fighting for belong more to the next generation than they do to me at this point. So when my friend Sasi asked if I would share my activism with his Environmental Anthropology class, how could I refuse? Of course, the first thing I did was bake up some Granola Bar & Pumpkin Pudding Squares because food closes the generational divide pretty quickly, in my opinion.

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Cabbage with a Kick Salad

My new friend Sasi, who is originally from Sri Lanka, has a garden full of hot peppers. So when I offered him a ride to a class we are taking together, he paid me back with a bag full of little bright Birds Eye chilies, Indian cayenne and serranos. There is only one way to repay kindness, repaying kindness…create kindness again. What could be kinder than cabbage?

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Unpacked Poblanos with Sweet Potato and Rice Filling

We are big fans of Tex-Mex food. And we love those classic stuffed poblano peppers with cheesy potatoes that you can find in good Mexican restaurants. There are enough meat and vegetarian versions to keep both me and my hubby satisfied. So when my market farmers started showing up with big green and red poblanos….well, you know we are headed to the border via my kitchen.

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The Tale of Miss Hissy and Her Three Little Kittens

Don and I have lived in our house in Edwardsville for 20 years this past June. We have always felt so at home here. We have great neighbors, dear friends, woodlands and quaint shops within walking distance. From nearly our first year on Grand Ave. we’ve also had “house guests”. The furry kind that live a life apart from us but intersect with our lives on a fairly regular basis—a pattern known as breakfast and dinner, for the most part.

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The Family Garden: Where Everything Is in Tune with Nature

I’m sure if you asked Jackie Mills, owner and main operator of The Family Garden in New Douglas, IL, what she does for a living, she’d tell you she farms. But when I visited her a couple of weeks ago and took a tour around her property to see all the projects she has going, I could swear she was conducting a symphony.

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Midwestern Antipasto

The idea for this flexible summer salad has a couple of inspirations. For one thing, the ingredients are primarily local to the Midwest and are available throughout late spring to early fall, more or less. For another thing, the preparation of the beets—the idea of cooking them intact with their greens attached—came from an episode of my favorite show, A Chef’s Life, starring Chef Vivian Howard. Chef Howard interviewed a local person, Matt from Crooked Fence Produce, who swore that beets would have a better flavor if they were boiled with their greens attached, rather than cutting the greens off and using them in another way—something both Chef Howard and I have always done.

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Coming Home to the Land of Goshen

The Land of Goshen Community Market—my farmers market—has been open two weekends already! Even though we’ve been lucky enough to have that once-a-month winter market during the off season, nothing beats hopping on my bike and riding “home” to the real deal. I smiled so much my face hurt that first Saturday.

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The Tale of the Shepherd’s Wife

There was a cold rain, and we stood in a damp barn, alongside a muddy pasture. And it was one of the best Saturday mornings I’ve spent in quite some time. My daughter Heather and I paid a visit to Tracy Riddle, owner and operator of The Shepherd’s Wife, a sheep farm just outside Hamel, IL. Tracy raises sheep (among other critters like Pac Man the Alpaca) and practices the ancient arts of spinning wool, dying yarn, and producing handcrafted soaps and lotions.

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Grandma’s Green Beans

So what were Heather’s top picks for her birthday dinner? She loves the Creamy Cauliflower Mac n’ Cheese I make, so that was on her list. Since we were trying out some gluten-free Jackson’s Honest Chips from the Blogger Box, I offered to make a new dip. And Heather, while a longtime vegetarian, does love an occasional fillet of grilled wild-caught salmon, so I splurged. But her final request sort of took me by surprise: “You know what I’d really like to have?” she asked. “Remember Grandma’s green beans, when she used to make them in a big pot for an entire day? I’d like those.”

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Winter Wellness Begins at Home

Don and I are pretty lucky when it comes to colds and flu. We are rarely sick, and when we are, the miserable feelings don’t seem to hang around for long. Of course, Don will tell you that I am a constant nag about the benefits of healthy, organic food, plenty of rest and moderation in all things “fun.” He exaggerates, but, perhaps, he also speaks the truth. While it is important to trust and heed the direction and advice from our chosen healthcare practitioners, there’s a lot we can do to keep ourselves healthy, none of which is very expensive or complicated. So here are some of my Green Gal favorite home remedies to get us through the rest of winter.

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Where Is Your Wild?

While watching this particular Nature episode on arctic wolves, I was also feeling a little sorry for myself. It’s doubtful my husband and I will be doing much traveling this year. Our decisions about less paid work and more family time—which I will never regret—have left us with less expendable income for stuff like vacations. So PBS may be my only brush with what is truly wild… or maybe not.

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Backwards to a Bright Sustainable Future

I stood in an empty pasture, staring north toward a stand of trees. It was a sunny day, cool but no wind. The quiet of the rural landscape was pleasant and disarming. In the distance came the pounding—at first a vibration—then sound like thunder rolling in from a...

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Farm Like a Girl

Blaine Bilyeu is a beautiful, statuesque redhead, with enormous blue eyes and flawless porcelain skin. She could have been in high fashion, but she chose, instead, to be… a pig farmer.

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A Peaceable Kingdom

This peaceable kingdom is the honey bee farm of my friend John Accornero. John is my friend who always brings me back to sanity when I get all riled up by the ways of the world. And having visited his farm, I can see why he is able to do this. A bee farm runs by balance, respect and equitability… I guess the way we’d all like the world to run, with a sense of fairness and a adherence to personal responsibility. Bees seem to have this all down; we are—at best—catching on.

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Saving Grace

Clearly wilderness had been under siege for a long time, and defending it now seemed unlikely. Yes, I was a raging torrent of opinion and blame when I first sat down to write.

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